All posts by Mary Stegmeir

Admitted writer/editor Mary Stegmeir welcomes additional comments and story ideas at mstegmeir@nacacnet.org.

3 Ways to Make the Most out of College

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Feeling stressed about the college application process? Take heart.

“There are plenty of great schools in this country, and what matters much more than how they are ranked is how you make use of their resources,” Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University (CT), writes in a recent column published by The Washington Post.

He continues: “When I talk to seniors and recent graduates from schools of all kinds and in various parts of the country, I find that it matters little how difficult it was to get admitted to that school and that it matters a great deal how hard they worked while attending it.”

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Testing Companies to Offer More Free Score Reports to Low-Income Students

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New policies unveiled this week by ACT and The College Board will reduce the fees low-income students encounter in the college admission process.

Starting in September, students who use a fee waiver to register for the ACT will be able to send up to 20 free score reports to the institutions of their choosing. Previously, ACT test-takers were allotted only five free reports, with each additional transmission costing $13.

Under the new College Board policy — which goes into effect next spring — low-income students who take the SAT will be able to send unlimited score reports to colleges. Previously, low-income SAT test-takers were allotted up to eight free score reports, with additional transmissions costing $12 each.

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Year in Review: ‘Admissions Live’ Will Examine the Top Trends of 2017

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What a year it’s been!

Review the highs, the lows, and everything in-between Monday during a special year-end episode of Admissions Live.

Host Adam Castro will be joined by Eric Hoover, a senior writer at The Chronicle of Higher Education; and Jon Boeckenstedt, associate vice president of enrollment management and marketing at DePaul University (IL). Together, they’ll identify the topics that got professionals talking this year and discuss how those trends will impact the field in the future.

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ICYMI: NACAC Opposes HEA Reauthorization Legislation

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Congress has signaled it’s ready to tackle reauthorization of the Higher Education Act (HEA), but a bill introduced last week in the US House of Representatives has NACAC and other education organizations concerned.

“While NACAC agrees that the HEA needs to be reauthorized, this bill goes about it in the wrong way,” Michael Rose, NACAC’s director for government relations noted in a press release. “After an initial review, it is clear this bill reduces or eliminates student protections against fraud and abuse, and further dilutes the federal contribution to improving access to postsecondary education.”

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Help Shape the Upcoming #NACACreads Discussion

Can you believe it’s already December? That means our next #NACACreads book chat is just a month away.

On Jan. 9, we’ll discuss My (Underground) American Dream with author Julissa Arce.

An estimated 65,000 undocumented immigrants graduate from US high schools each year. In 2001, Arce was one of those students.

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Counselor Organizes ‘Instant Admission’ College Fair

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Could an early offer of admission encourage more minority students to pursue postsecondary education?

A Maryland counselor put that idea to the test this fall by organizing an “instant admission college fair.”

The event, held last month, drew students from 20 Baltimore County high schools and featured admission representatives from 15 historically black colleges and universities.

High school seniors — armed with their transcripts, test scores, and optional writing samples and recommendation letters — met with college reps and received admission decisions on-site. By the end of the day, more than 950 acceptances had been extended to students.

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Study: Grant Aid Most Effective When Aimed at Poor Students

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Grant programs for low-income students yield greater returns than assistance efforts aimed at students from higher-income families, new data suggests.

A working paper published this month by the Upjohn Institute found that Pell Grant recipients at four-year colleges in Texas saw improved academic and economic outcomes.

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FAFSA Mobile App Will Launch This Spring

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Students and parents will soon be able to use their smartphones to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

US Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced Tuesday that the mobile platform will roll out this spring as part of a larger effort to modernize the federal student aid system.

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Survey: Most Americans Support Postsecondary Education

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Most Americans believe postsecondary education remains a valuable commodity for today’s young people, according to results from a new national survey.

“The vast majority of Americans (86 percent) feel that higher education after high school enhances job prospects,” according to a new report from Civis Analytics. “Most (89 percent) also think high school students should pursue an education program after graduation from high school.”

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