Students: Share Your Financial Aid Letters with NPR

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Did you find it difficult to decipher the financial aid packages offered to you by colleges?

If so, NPR wants to hear from you.

“We expect that reading through these forms will help us understand the challenges that families across the country face when deciphering their financial aid awards — what money you’ll get, what you’re expected to pay, and what all of that means for your family,” the submission form notes. “We hope that, in turn, we can help our readers and listeners understand how they can better understand their own forms — and how colleges and universities can help make higher education accessible for potential students.”

Families who chose to submit their forms will also be asked to provide contact information. NPR will follow-up with students and families before using their letters in a story.

Learn more.

Admitted writer/editor Mary Stegmeir welcomes additional comments and story ideas at mstegmeir@nacacnet.org.

2 thoughts on “Students: Share Your Financial Aid Letters with NPR”

  1. As Dean of Enrollment Management and Student Financial Services at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, WA, I am proud to say our award letters are very transparent and easy to interpret, much like the shopping sheet. It would be great if NPR also talks to students with award letters that are not difficult to decipher.

  2. There are two important initiatives that could be taken by the Department of Education in this regard. One would be to enforce the mandate regarding net price calculators, making sure they are accurate and up to date. Secondly, to develop a standardized award letter that clearly delineates a student’s out of pocket cost without loan or work. (Direct costs minus grants and scholarships)

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