#NACACreads: Gen Z Students Take New Approach to College Selection

generationzThe first wave of Generation Z students had just entered kindergarten on 9/11.

They lived through the Great Recession and came of age in an era defined by new technologies that changed the way we learn and connect with others.

And today, as students born between 1995 and 2010 begin to search for and select colleges, those formative experiences loom large, author Meghan Grace said Tuesday during a #NACACreads Twitter discussion of Generation Z Goes to College.

Continue reading #NACACreads: Gen Z Students Take New Approach to College Selection

New Report Highlights Access and Inclusion Strategies

iStock
iStock

Low-income and minority students continue to face barriers to higher education and the resulting gaps have contributed to diminished social mobility in the US, data show.

A new report — Advancing Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education — highlights strategies institutions can use to help reverse that trend. The 89-page publication uses federal statistics to demonstrate the scale of the problem and highlights strategies colleges and universities can use to help more underrepresented students get to (and through) college.

Continue reading New Report Highlights Access and Inclusion Strategies

#NACACreads: Join Tuesday’s Discussion of ‘Generation Z Goes to College’

generationzHow will the next generation of students approach the college search and selection process?

Share your insights and ask questions during Tuesday’s #NACACreads discussion of Generation Z Goes to College. Special guest Meghan Grace, one of the book’s authors, will take part in the Twitter chat and address how this new cohort of students views higher education.

Continue reading #NACACreads: Join Tuesday’s Discussion of ‘Generation Z Goes to College’

Completing a Dependency Appeal for Financial Aid

iStock
iStock

You may be advising a student who lives with their grandmother or aunt, but was never legally adopted. In other instances, an older brother, sister, or family friend is raising a child but no official adoption took place.

For some families, this approach may have offered a way to handle conflicts and crises without involving the court system. However, complications can arise when it comes time to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

Continue reading Completing a Dependency Appeal for Financial Aid

ICYMI: NACAC Affirms Longstanding Values Following Presidential Election

NACAC CEO Joyce Smith sent the following message to members last week:

Dear Colleagues,

I have seen a number of accounts about anxiety in our schools, colleges, and communities following the election, and I’ve heard from many of you who are asking about NACAC’s response.

As the dust settles from one of the most contentious presidential races in our history, concerns have emerged about the future of programs and initiatives that promote equal access to higher education, as well as the safety and security of the students we serve.

Continue reading ICYMI: NACAC Affirms Longstanding Values Following Presidential Election

6 Ways Colleges and Universities Award Financial Aid

iStock
iStock

When parents and students complete financial aid and scholarship applications they hope the end result provides a significant amount of funding.

Net price calculators and other tools can help predict a student’s projected cost of attendance. But too often, families wait until the initial financial aid award letters arrive from colleges and then wonder how to finance the gap between what was offered and their own resources.

Help the families you serve by familiarizing yourself with the most common methods used by colleges to award financial aid. By reviewing a college’s website, talking to a school representative, or even taking a campus tour, you can gain knowledge about the institution’s approach to helping families fund a college education.

Continue reading 6 Ways Colleges and Universities Award Financial Aid

Member View: Counseling While White

Author note: This piece was written in the days before the Presidential election. The issues discussed here are only more pressing as a wave of bias incidents occur on our campuses and impact our diverse communities.

Can I speak to my white colleagues for a moment? Over the past several years, we Americans have been struggling to confront our racial history — frequent cases of police brutality, racist incidents on college campuses, and a controversial presidential election have dominated the national news cycle. As college admission counselors we may find ourselves engaged in these conversations as well (wittingly or not), given the ways in which racism affects a rapidly diversifying student population. For white counselors in particular, these conversations can feel like uncharted territory.

Continue reading Member View: Counseling While White

Survey: Admission Offices Prepared for Changes to Overtime Rule

iStock
iStock

Editor’s note: This post has been updated to reflect the federal injunction.

Adjusting salaries, altering work schedules, and paying overtime during peak periods are among strategies admission offices plan to use to comply with a new federal rule governing employee pay, according to NACAC survey data.

The updated regulations — originally scheduled to take effect on Dec. 1 — would significantly broaden the pool of employees eligible for overtime pay through the Fair Labor Standards Act.  However, a federal judge’s injunction last week has halted the rule’s implementation.

Continue reading Survey: Admission Offices Prepared for Changes to Overtime Rule

ACT to Offer Testing Accommodations for English Language Learners

iStock
iStock

English Language Learners (ELL) taking the ACT will soon be able to apply for testing accommodations.

Starting next fall, students who receive ELL services can ask for additional time on the test and other supports, including the use of a word-to-word bilingual glossary.

Continue reading ACT to Offer Testing Accommodations for English Language Learners

Obama Calls for Celebration of American Education Week

iStock
iStock

President Barack Obama is calling for support of local schools and educators in recognition of American Education Week — a seven-day celebration that runs through Saturday.

In a proclamation issued last week, Obama asked Americans to do their part to help “create opportunities for every school and student.” He also emphasized the importance of creating pathways to higher education for all.

Continue reading Obama Calls for Celebration of American Education Week