Category Archives: Access

Thoughts from a Former College Admission Officer in the COVID-19 Era

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Editor’s Note: This post was originally published by The Education Trust. See the original article.

Amid increased anxiety over a global pandemic, parents and students alike are frantically adjusting to the new reality of school shutdowns, online learning, cancellation of standardized tests, library closings, the postponement of extracurricular activities, and limited travel. Meanwhile, there is a group of students that is eagerly awaiting college admission for fall 2020. How will the COVID-19 pandemic impact the college-going decisions of students, and how should colleges adjust admission criteria accordingly?

In a previous Ed Trust blog, I argued that institutions should, as the Supreme Court currently allows, use race as a factor in college admission, since the measures that most colleges use in their admission criteria (strength of curriculum, standardized test scores, grade point average, and non-academic factors) disadvantage students from low-income backgrounds and students of color. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, the reality is that these same students will likely be disadvantaged by the factors that colleges and universities value in admission.

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Register for Our College Signing Day Webinar

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Decision Day is fast approaching. May 1 is the deadline for students to accept an offer of admission at many institutions.

And once again, Reach Higher is encouraging schools and communities to host College Signing Day events in recognition of their students’ hard work.

To help counselors and college advisers prepare, NACAC is partnering with Reach Higher and the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) to offer a College Signing Day webinar.

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NACAC Member Organization Nets $400,000 to Expand Programming

Students from Chicago Scholars celebrate Team LeBron’s win. Courtesy of Chicago Scholars

Perhaps no one cared more about the outcome of the NBA All-Star Game this past weekend than Chicago Scholars, a NACAC member organization that helps first-generation students navigate the transitions to college, through college, and beyond to a career.

Handpicked by team captain LeBron James, the community-based access organization stood to win up to $500,000 to help students reach their college dreams thanks to the All-Star game’s new format.

Continue reading NACAC Member Organization Nets $400,000 to Expand Programming

‘If not us, then who?’

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Editor’s note: A version of this column was first published on Holistic College Mentor in April 2016. The author’s sister is currently in her senior year at Utica College (NY) and is on track to earn a master’s degree in health and physical education next year.

Never did I think that it would be somewhat difficult to usher my sister through the college application process. Her life had been far more complicated than mine, but she was determined to succeed. I was the first in our family to graduate from high school and college. She was inspired by that. Most of the same folks who were against my decision to go away for college supported her choice.

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NACAC Urges Flexibility in Wake of Coronavirus

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NACAC is one of several education organizations encouraging their members to be mindful of the impacts of the Novel Coronavirus (nCoV) outbreak on students, families, staff, and colleagues.

In a statement issued yesterday, the association urged flexibility for students, families, and counselors in the affected areas and encouraged its members to take action where necessary.

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Changes to SNAP Program Could Affect College Students

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Recent changes could limit the ability of some college students to access Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, according to a recent report by National Public Radio.

A rule approved last month by the Trump administration will make it harder for states to waive the requirement that SNAP recipients work at least 20 hours a week. According to policy experts interviewed by NPR, the shift “will limit benefits for college students enrolled less than half the time.”

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School Districts Can Help Students Adopt New Attitudes About Admission Process

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Editor’s note:  A version of this post was originally published on Admitted in December 2016. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series. 

School districts may be able to boost college-going rates by changing the way they introduce students to the application process, according to an article published by the Harvard Business Review.

Too often, the conversation is focused on ensuring students submit an application to at least one college, writes researcher Lindsay Page. But when teens apply to a range of institutions “they are more likely to get accepted to an institution that is a good fit,” she notes.

Continue reading School Districts Can Help Students Adopt New Attitudes About Admission Process

New College Guide Available to Support Indigenous Students

A new college-going guide created for Native students by Native students is now available.

The 36-page Indigenous College Planning Guidebook was published by the College Board this fall and features advice and insights from Native college students regarding the admission process.

The free resource includes information about college prep programs, scholarships, and on-campus resources aimed specifically at Native students. It also offers step-by-step instructions to help students select challenging high school classes, apply for financial aid, and complete college applications.

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3 Ways to Help Vet Succeed

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Editor’s note:  This post was originally published on Admitted in May 2017. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series. 

More than 5 million post-9/11 service members are projected to transition out of the military by 2020.

Many will seek out higher education. But while veterans can bring tremendous value to the nation’s college campuses, their path to a degree is often more complex than that of a traditional undergrad.

Continue reading 3 Ways to Help Vet Succeed