Category Archives: Access

Report: Good Information about College Costs Can Boost Access

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Low-income students are only one-eighth as likely as their wealthier peers to graduate from college.

This statistic, from a 2015 report by the Association of American Colleges & Universities, is the product of a variety of factors. But one of the biggest driving forces is a lack of information.

So how can colleges and universities clarify financial information to help reduce barriers to higher education for low-income students?

The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation has a few ideas.

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Coalition App to Provide Fee Waiver for Veterans

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A new initiative from the Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success seeks to boost college-going rates among members of the US armed forces.

Starting next year, a group of Coalition colleges will waive their application fees for veterans and current service members applying for the 2019-2020 academic year.

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‘My (Underground) American Dream’ Selected for #NACACreads

An estimated 65,000 undocumented immigrants graduate from US high schools each year.

In 2001, Julissa Arce was one of those students.

“I graduated in the top 5 percent of my class,” she wrote in her memoir, My (Underground) American Dream. “I was all smiles. My whole family was proud of me. And all of us were worried.”

Join us Jan. 9 for a #NACACreads discussion of Arce’s book and the challenges undocumented students face as they make their way to and through higher education. Arce will participate in the hour-long Twitter chat, which kicks off at 9 p.m. ET.

Continue reading ‘My (Underground) American Dream’ Selected for #NACACreads

New Advocacy Resources Available to Support Undocumented Students

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Campus leaders who want to support undocumented students have a new place to turn for information.

Earlier this month, the Protect Dreamers Higher Education Coalition, of which NACAC is a member, created a new website highlighting facts about undocumented students and providing advocacy resources.

The coalition is encouraging colleges and universities to recognize Oct. 16-20 as Protect Dreamers Week. New resources created to help educators and others advocate on behalf of DREAMers include a fact sheet and talking points.

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Report Examines Experiences of First-Gen Students

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Prospective first-generation college students cite high educational aspirations as 10th graders, but take longer to enroll in college and are less likely than their peers to earn a degree.

Those findings are included in a new research brief from the US Department of Education’s Institute of Educational Sciences. The report uses 10 years of data collected from a nationally representative sample of students who were high school sophomores in 2002.

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Shaun Harper’s Keynote Speech from #NACAC17

Professor Shaun Harper, executive director of the University of Southern California’s Race & Equity Center, served as the keynote speaker at NACAC’s 2017 National Conference in Boston.

Watch (or re-watch) the speech and read NACAC CEO Joyce Smith’s reflections on Harper’s message.

Continue reading Shaun Harper’s Keynote Speech from #NACAC17

DACA Update: What You Need to Know

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President Trump announced this week that the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program will end in six months.

Since 2012, DACA has provided deportation relief to undocumented youth who came to the country before the age of 16, as long as they met certain criteria.

NACAC was among several education organizations to speak out against Trump’s decision. In a statement released on Tuesday, the association said the move to eliminate DACA was a “regressive step that hurts many of America’s brightest, most vulnerable youth.”

Continue reading DACA Update: What You Need to Know

Supporting All Students: First-Gen Student-Turned-Prof Offers Tips

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David Hernández is an assistant professor of Latino/a studies at Mount Holyoke College. But before joining academia, he was a first-generation university student.

Having experienced university life from two perspectives, Hernández recently reflected on what would have helped make college more accessible to him the first time around.

He wrote a personal essay featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education that shares his experience as an 18-year-old and asks, “What could today’s universities and colleges do differently for a student like me?”

Continue reading Supporting All Students: First-Gen Student-Turned-Prof Offers Tips