All posts by Ashley Dobson

How to Support Your Colleagues and Students Impacted by Harvey

Hurricane Harvey and its subsequent floods have impacted more than 1 million students in 244 public and charter school districts statewide, according to the Texas Education Agency. And that total doesn’t take into account the region’s impacted college students or K-12 students in Louisiana who are starting to see flooding as a result of Harvey’s path.

Though the full impact of Harvey on students and schools will remain unknown for months to come, members of NACAC have been asking what they can do to help.

Here are some ways you can help your colleagues and the impacted schools in Texas.

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Professional Considerations: Admission Counselors Respond to Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey has left a lot of unknowns in its wake.

If and when students get to return to their schools, the schools will likely look significantly different: structural damage, fans to help dry out the building, missing book collections. And beyond the physical, the emotional impacts of this disaster could haunt them for years to come.

Continue reading Professional Considerations: Admission Counselors Respond to Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey: Counselors Share Their Stories

Hurricane Harvey devastated parts of Texas and Louisiana for the greater part of last week. The scale of the storm and flooding is unprecedented, impacting millions across 53 counties in Texas and parts of Southwest Louisiana.

Harvey made landfall near Rockport, Texas with winds of 130 mph on Aug. 22. The storm then moved toward the Houston metro area and lingered for several days, dumping nearly 52 inches of rain before hitting the coastal cities of Beaumont and Port Arthur with 26 inches of rain in 24 hours as it looked toward a second landfall in Louisiana.

While much of the focus has been on the homes that were lost, the storm has also flooded and destroyed schools, and has impacted more than 1 million students in 244 public and charter school districts in Texas alone, according to USA Today.

NACAC spoke with counselors in the impacted areas to learn about their experiences and find out how Harvey will impact their school and students in the weeks ahead.

Continue reading Hurricane Harvey: Counselors Share Their Stories

5 Social Media Tips for #nacac17

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NACAC’s 73rd National Conference in Boston kicks off in just a few days and there are so many ways to get involved. As the social media manager for NACAC I might be biased, but I think that getting involved with the conference on social media is one of best ways to connect with your colleagues and ensure you don’t miss a moment of the action.

But what are the best ways to do that? Follow these simple tips to get the most out of your national conference social media experience.

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Program Spotlight: NACAC Fairs Introduce Young Women to STEM Fields

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Women’s Equality Day, which will be celebrated Saturday, commemorates the day the 19th Amendment was certified to the Constitution in 1920.

The amendment granted women the right to vote, but the observance of Women’s Equality Day is not just about celebrating how far we’ve come. It’s about recognizing continuing efforts toward full equality of the genders.

American women are still underrepresented in many professions, including the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

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Report: Community College Paves the Way to Four-Year Degrees

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The bachelor’s degree pipeline is growing stronger for community college graduates.

A new report by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center found that of community college graduates who hold no previous degrees or certificates, 41 percent earn a bachelor’s degree within the next six years.

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Supporting All Students: First-Gen Student-Turned-Prof Offers Tips

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David Hernández is an assistant professor of Latino/a studies at Mount Holyoke College. But before joining academia, he was a first-generation university student.

Having experienced university life from two perspectives, Hernández recently reflected on what would have helped make college more accessible to him the first time around.

He wrote a personal essay featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education that shares his experience as an 18-year-old and asks, “What could today’s universities and colleges do differently for a student like me?”

Continue reading Supporting All Students: First-Gen Student-Turned-Prof Offers Tips