Perspective: College Admission Leaves Low-Income Students Behind

Courtesy of Personal Statement

The college admission process is complex and the fight for equity and access within it is far from over.

Enoch Jemmott, now a senior at Queens College (NY), recently shared his experience as a low-income student navigating the college admission process in a The New York Times piece titled, “The Implicit Punishment of Daring to Go to College When Poor.”

“I came to realize that, in every step along the way, we had to do more because we had less,” Jemmott wrote.

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Instagram Accounts for Admitted Students Influence Decisions

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Instagram is the new Facebook for college-bound students.

Facebook was originally designed to connect college students. The social network’s audience now skews older, but that doesn’t mean new students aren’t still connecting online before they even get to campus.

Accepted students are now starting Instagram accounts for their class. A new crop of Class of 2023 accounts has just popped up on Instagram and admitted and prospective students are using them to make their final decisions, pick a roommate, and connect before classes begin in the fall.

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Report: Public Research Universities Prioritize Out-of-State, High-Income Recruitment

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Public research universities often aren’t putting their money where their mouth is when it comes to student recruitment.

A new report from The Joyce Foundation found that most public research universities prioritize recruiting out-of-state students and were less likely to visit schools in low-income areas.

The report analyzed recruiting visits to local high schools made by admission staff at 15 public research universities in the US.

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Emphasis on Financial Literacy Could Help Students Borrow More Responsibly

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Financial literacy is not typically a top priority for American teens but new research shows that taking a course in personal finance could help teens borrow more responsibly for college.

Researchers at Montana State University found when students are required to take personal finance courses to graduate high school, they are more likely to shift from high-cost borrowing to low-cost borrowing to finance their college degree.

Students who took these classes were about 10 percent more likely to apply for federal financial aid and take out a federal loan than those without financial education, according to the study.

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Member View: Ditch the College Admission Stress

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The college search and application process can be a stressful time for families and students. But there are ways to manage this stress and anxiety.

Sherri Geller, co-director of college counseling at Gann Academy (MA), recently shared her stress management tips with JewishBoston.

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Report: Rethinking Work-Study Programs

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The Federal Work-Study program currently offers low-income students the opportunity to work while enrolled in higher education. But could it also serve as a career-readiness program?

A new report from the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) gives recommendations for how colleges can rethink work-study programs to more intentionally prepare students for the “real world.”

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Planning is Key to Successful Community College Transfer

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Students who transfer to a four-year college or university from a community college are more likely to graduate than other transfer students. However, planning out the move is necessary for success.

KCUR 89.3, the NPR station in the Kansas City, KS area, recently ran a piece on tips for making your transfer from a community college as smooth as possible.

The biggest message – planning ahead is the way to go.

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New Report Offers Admission Framework for Displaced Students

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Verifying transcripts and information from outside the US can often be a challenge for colleges and universities. But what about applicants who aren’t able to provide documentation at all?

A new analysis and toolkit, “Inclusive Admissions Policies for Displaced and Vulnerable Students,” from the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) offers a framework for colleges and universities as they work with displaced students.

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A New Way to Measure Student Success

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Could a video game ever replace standardized testing’s role in college admission?

Enter 27-year-old Rebecca Kantar and Imbellus Inc., her start-up that aims to reinvent testing.

Imbellus wasn’t started with the recent bribery scandal in mind, but Kantar told Bloomberg Businessweek that it is “cheatproof.”

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