Join the Latino/Hispanic SIG for a Book Discussion

Join NACAC’s Latino/Hispanic Special Interest Group tomorrow — Jan. 22 — for a book discussion of Music to My Years: A Mixtape-Memoir of Growing Up and Standing Up.

Author and comedian Cristela Alonzo will join the virtual chat, scheduled to kick off at 3 p.m. PT/6 p.m. ET.

In her memoir, Alonzo — who created and starred in the ABC sitcom Cristela — shares personal stories about growing up as a first-generation Mexican American in Texas. She also writes about the challenges she’s faced professionally as a woman of color.

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Changes to SNAP Program Could Affect College Students

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Recent changes could limit the ability of some college students to access Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, according to a recent report by National Public Radio.

A rule approved last month by the Trump administration will make it harder for states to waive the requirement that SNAP recipients work at least 20 hours a week. According to policy experts interviewed by NPR, the shift “will limit benefits for college students enrolled less than half the time.”

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Best of the Decade: The Journal of College Admission

This past decade marked a notable shift for The Journal of College Admission.

In 2015, it was redesigned and moved from a peer-reviewed research journal to a quarterly magazine offering practical tips, research-to-practice information, member profiles, upcoming events, and news you can use.

But the one thing that hasn’t changed across the years is the high quality of articles from our members.

Enjoy taking a trip down memory lane as we look back at some of the best Journal articles of the decade.

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#NACACreads: Boosting Student Happiness

Student mental health has been a hot topic among educators for the last decade or so. But, too often, efforts to address this important issue have centered on students who are already struggling.

In contrast, When Likes Aren’t Enough: A Crash Course in the Science of Happiness, focuses on prevention. The book, our latest #NACACreads selection, shines a light on positive psychology strategies that can be used by all students to increase their sense of well-being.

“Positive psychology studies the behaviors and mindsets that contribute to psychological health, well-being, and flourishing,” author Tim Bono explained during this week’s #NACACreads chat. “…(It’s) interested in getting in on the front end of the mental health crisis by identifying behaviors that can proactively build well-being and provide a buffer against distress before clinical interventions become necessary.”

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School Districts Can Help Students Adopt New Attitudes About Admission Process

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Editor’s note:  A version of this post was originally published on Admitted in December 2016. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series. 

School districts may be able to boost college-going rates by changing the way they introduce students to the application process, according to an article published by the Harvard Business Review.

Too often, the conversation is focused on ensuring students submit an application to at least one college, writes researcher Lindsay Page. But when teens apply to a range of institutions “they are more likely to get accepted to an institution that is a good fit,” she notes.

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