International ACAC Calls for Equal Access to Admission Tests

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A NACAC affiliate is calling on testing companies to ensure all students worldwide have equal access to US college admission exams.

Fewer ACT and SAT test dates were provided this year for international students when compared to their peers living in the US, according to a statement from the International Association for College Admission Counseling. In addition, in recent years students outside the US have had to deal with frequent test cancellations or changes in testing due to concerns about test security. Communication about those developments “has neither been comprehensive or timely,” the statement notes.

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Reminder: Keep an Eye on Financial Aid Deadlines

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Need financial aid for the 2018-19 academic year?

The US Department of Education is reminding students to remain cognizant of deadlines when completing the FAFSA.

While the FAFSA is primarily used to award federal financial aid, many colleges, states, and scholarship programs also use the form to assess eligibility for their aid programs.

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Expert Advice: Listing College Options on the FAFSA

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Getting ready to help students fill out the FAFSA?

The Department of Education released a list this week highlighting the eight steps that need to be followed when filing for federal student aid. And included in the article is an important reminder: Students can — and should — list multiple colleges on their FAFSA.

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Report Examines Experiences of First-Gen Students

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Prospective first-generation college students cite high educational aspirations as 10th graders, but take longer to enroll in college and are less likely than their peers to earn a degree.

Those findings are included in a new research brief from the US Department of Education’s Institute of Educational Sciences. The report uses 10 years of data collected from a nationally representative sample of students who were high school sophomores in 2002.

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Shaun Harper’s Keynote Speech from #NACAC17

Professor Shaun Harper, executive director of the University of Southern California’s Race & Equity Center, served as the keynote speaker at NACAC’s 2017 National Conference in Boston.

Watch (or re-watch) the speech and read NACAC CEO Joyce Smith’s reflections on Harper’s message.

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Study: Grads of For-Profit Colleges Face Job Market Hurdles

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Students who earned their bachelor’s degree from an online for-profit college are less likely to find success in the job market, research shows.

Such applicants were 22 percent less likely than their counterparts from non-selective public institutions to receive a call back when applying for positions that required a business degree, according to a study published in 2016 by the American Economic Review.

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Study: Are Today’s Teens Afraid to Grow Up?

Dating and obtaining a driver’s license have long been American rites of passage, but a new study suggests that today’s teens seem less interested in meeting those milestones than prior generations.

A study published this week in the journal Child Development showed a sharp decline over the past decade in the percentage of adolescents who date or drive. The share of teens who have tried alcohol or held a paying job has also decreased.

And while some of the data may suggest that teens are making healthier choices, the overall trend of delaying adulthood may speak to the increased pressures today’s kids face, according to a Washington Post article examining the new findings.

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Op-Ed: Incentives for Returning Students Could Boost College Completion Rates

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Want to increase the number of US adults who hold bachelor’s degrees?

One former college president is urging legislators to offer financial incentives to adult students who wish to return to school.

One in five Americans between the ages of 25 and 64 started college but have not finished, Sanford J. Ungar wrote in a Washington Post op-ed published last month.

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Daily updates on NACAC and the world of college admission counseling. For more information about NACAC, visit nacacnet.org.