Category Archives: Uncategorized

Funding Will Soon Expire for Programs Serving Students with Cognitive Disabilities

iStock

College programs serving students with intellectual disabilities face an uncertain future, according to The Hechinger Report.

Across the nation, 281 colleges offer transition programs for young people with cognitive disabilities, such as Down syndrome. But federal funding that has helped finance many of the programs expires next year, forcing colleges to search for other options.

Some of the programs — which provide tailored academic and occupational training — “are looking to nonprofits or foundations for support, while others are considering scaling back staffing or raising fees,” Cate Weir told The Hechinger Report.

Continue reading Funding Will Soon Expire for Programs Serving Students with Cognitive Disabilities

DACA Case Goes Before US Supreme Court

iStock

The US Supreme Court will hear arguments today about the legality of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and whether the Trump administration acted within the law two years ago when it moved to end the program.

The DACA program was created in June 2012 and provided protection from deportation for certain undocumented youth. In some cases, having DACA status allowed young people to qualify for in-state tuition and financial aid — increasing their access to higher education.

Continue reading DACA Case Goes Before US Supreme Court

ICYMI: American Dream and Promise Act Clears First Hurdle

iStock

The US House of Representatives passed legislation last week that would allow undocumented students to remain in the country legally.

The American Dream and Promise Act would provide permanent legal protections and a path to citizenship for those commonly referred to as Dreamers. This legislation, which still needs to clear the Senate, would allow qualified undocumented students and others to remain in the US and pursue their education and careers without the threat of deportation.

Continue reading ICYMI: American Dream and Promise Act Clears First Hurdle

#NACACreads: Author Tony Jack to Discuss ‘The Privileged Poor’

Everyone wants to hear what Tony Jack has to say.

In the past three months, the Harvard sociologist has been featured on NPR, CNN, PBS, and other media outlets talking about disadvantaged students, college access, and the admission process.

And this September, he’ll be chatting with NACAC members.

Jack, author of The Privileged Poor, has agreed to join us for a #NACACreads discussion focused on his book. The conversation—which will also provide opportunities for admission professionals to share their insights about the experiences of disadvantaged students—will kick off on Twitter at 9 p.m. ET on Sept. 17.

Continue reading #NACACreads: Author Tony Jack to Discuss ‘The Privileged Poor’

A Counselor’s Thank You to Teachers

iStock

Editor’s note:  This post was originally published on Admitted in May 2018. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series and in celebration of National Teacher Appreciation Week. Teacher Appreciation Day is May 7 and Appreciation Week runs through Friday, May 10.

We hear about all the great teachers in the counseling office. The one who set the times tables to the tune of Pharrell Williams’ “Happy,” ensuring kids will remember them forever, even if it will take a while to get to eight times nine. Mr. Jones, the history teacher who dressed up like Benjamin Franklin for an entire week and never once broke character. The 10th grade English teacher who finally explained “i after e” in a way that made sense. When you put that much thought into a lesson, it makes for memorable teaching.

Continue reading A Counselor’s Thank You to Teachers

Vets Face Barriers When Applying to Many Elite Universities

iStock

Veterans bring life experience and a unique perspective to college classrooms. So why aren’t vets found on the campuses of the most selective schools in the US?

Out of about 1 million veterans and their family members enrolled in higher education under the GI Bill, just 844 veterans are enrolled in the nation’s 36 most selective schools.

“In leadership and life, symbolism counts. Intentional or not, the low numbers of veterans signals to all of higher ed that these students do not matter,” community college writing professor Wick Sloane told The Hechinger Report.

Continue reading Vets Face Barriers When Applying to Many Elite Universities

Department of Education Releases Online PSLF Tool

iStock

Think you may qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)? A new tool from the Department of Education can help you determine your eligibility.

The PSLF program was established in 2007 with the intent to reward public service employees who meet certain requirement by forgiving their student loan debt. In order to qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness, student loan borrowers must work full-time at a qualifying government or nonprofit organization and make 120 qualifying payments.

Continue reading Department of Education Releases Online PSLF Tool

Transition to College Can be Challenging for Rural Students

iStock

The faces of rural education in America are changing, but the challenges these students encounter in earning a college degree have not.

Universities have been slow to recognize these issues, but programs for supporting rural students are starting to crop up across the country.

“We never really came to terms with the fact that they needed extra support,” Naomi Norman, associate vice president for instruction at the University of Georgia, told NPR.

Though rural students graduate from high school at higher rates than urban students and at about the same levels as suburban students, only 59 percent go straight to college. And even if they enroll, they are more likely to drop out than their suburban and urban counterparts.

Continue reading Transition to College Can be Challenging for Rural Students

#NACACreads: Transcript of Chat with Author Karen Gross

On Dec. 12, #NACACreads chatted with Karen Gross about her book, Breakaway Learners . The book calls on college counselors and others to rethink the ways they help students prepare for life beyond high school.

Couldn’t make the discussion? Use this chat transcript to catch up on what you missed.

Continue reading #NACACreads: Transcript of Chat with Author Karen Gross