Category Archives: Uncategorized

How to Write Your Admission Counseling Job Application

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By: Lisa Meyer and Kati Sweaney

Have you been eyeing the NACAC Career Center lately? Maybe you’ve found that perfect next step — but what’s the best way to present yourself when applying? Here are four ways you can leverage what you already know about college admission to become a standout job applicant.

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The Value of the Humanities

The humanities add meaning to the most profound moments of our lives, but they also bear burdens—notably, the myth that their study is inconsistent with a practical and prosperous career.

Experience shows us otherwise.

Keen students of the humanities can think critically and analytically. They express themselves persuasively in speech and writing (often in more than one language), empathize, mobilize diverse individuals and talents in teamwork and problem-solving, and boldly range outside the box as leaders in education, business, economics, law, and media.

For those students (and parents) still uncertain about the value of the humanities in higher education, here are a few points to consider.

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Lessons in Boosting FAFSA Completion Rates

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Louisiana became the first state in the nation in 2018 to set FAFSA completion as a high school graduation requirement.

Since then, Illinois and Texas have adopted similar policies and several other states are weighing the option.

Officials from Louisiana recently shared their state’s story during a webinar organized by the Education Commission of the States. During the hour-long presentation, education leaders explained the process Louisiana followed when adopting the new requirement and discussed how counselors can support students as they file for financial aid.

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Join the Latino/Hispanic SIG for a Book Discussion

Join NACAC’s Latino/Hispanic Special Interest Group tomorrow — Jan. 22 — for a book discussion of Music to My Years: A Mixtape-Memoir of Growing Up and Standing Up.

Author and comedian Cristela Alonzo will join the virtual chat, scheduled to kick off at 3 p.m. PT/6 p.m. ET.

In her memoir, Alonzo — who created and starred in the ABC sitcom Cristela — shares personal stories about growing up as a first-generation Mexican American in Texas. She also writes about the challenges she’s faced professionally as a woman of color.

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Parenting Your College Student: Navigating New Terrain Over Winter Break

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Editor’s note:  A version of this post was originally published on Admitted in January 2019. It’s being republished as part of NACAC’s Best of the Blog series. 

The Class of 2023 will soon be home from college for their first winter break and many parents are seeing a new dynamic in their relationship with their children.

These college freshmen have just had their first taste of independence and striking the right balance can be tough for families.

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Gen Z Seeks Greater Flexibility in Higher Ed

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One in five.

That’s the number of Gen Z students who, according to a recent national survey, say they may choose not to attend college.

“They see a college degree as perhaps not necessary for future jobs, and they’re worried about racking up student debt,” Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University (NY), writes in a recent op-ed published by Forbes.

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Funding Will Soon Expire for Programs Serving Students with Cognitive Disabilities

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College programs serving students with intellectual disabilities face an uncertain future, according to The Hechinger Report.

Across the nation, 281 colleges offer transition programs for young people with cognitive disabilities, such as Down syndrome. But federal funding that has helped finance many of the programs expires next year, forcing colleges to search for other options.

Some of the programs — which provide tailored academic and occupational training — “are looking to nonprofits or foundations for support, while others are considering scaling back staffing or raising fees,” Cate Weir told The Hechinger Report.

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DACA Case Goes Before US Supreme Court

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The US Supreme Court will hear arguments today about the legality of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and whether the Trump administration acted within the law two years ago when it moved to end the program.

The DACA program was created in June 2012 and provided protection from deportation for certain undocumented youth. In some cases, having DACA status allowed young people to qualify for in-state tuition and financial aid — increasing their access to higher education.

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ICYMI: American Dream and Promise Act Clears First Hurdle

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The US House of Representatives passed legislation last week that would allow undocumented students to remain in the country legally.

The American Dream and Promise Act would provide permanent legal protections and a path to citizenship for those commonly referred to as Dreamers. This legislation, which still needs to clear the Senate, would allow qualified undocumented students and others to remain in the US and pursue their education and careers without the threat of deportation.

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