All posts by Ashley Dobson

Member View: Change Your Mentality on College Rejection

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Rejection is always tough whether it’s at work, in a relationship, or in college admission.

NACAC member Rick Clark, the director of undergraduate admissions at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has some advice.

First, if you’ve been rejected, Clark writes, you likely need to take a moment. It’s okay that you’re not okay.

“Go ahead and scream, cry, beat your pillow, cook or eat a lot of something (do all of those at once if you’re really upset). You do you. Whatever it takes to begin clearing your head,” he wrote.

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Students Believe School Shootings are Top Issue Facing US

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School shootings are a primary driver of student activism and political interest, a new study found.

In a study shared by Axios, 68 percent of people aged 14 to 29 said school shootings are the most important issue facing the US.

“The issue connects young Americans unlike anything except 9/11 in the last 20 years,” said John Della Volpe, director of polling at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics, told Axios.

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Facebook Live: Join Us to Talk About NACAC’s Advocacy Efforts

Wondering how you can play a role in NACAC’s advocacy efforts?

We’ll be broadcasting via Facebook Live on Tuesday, Jan 22 with Jim Fowler, NACAC Government Relations Committee chair and vice president for enrollment management at Salve Regina University (RI). Tune in at noon ET to learn more about the work of the Government Relations Committee, Fowler’s journey to his role as chair, and NACAC’s policy priorities.

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Call for Proposals: Submission Deadline Extended for National Conference

Looking for a meaningful way to share your expertise with college admission professionals from across the country? Want to facilitate deeper conversations with your colleagues?

The deadline for 2019 National Conference session proposals and facilitators has been extended to Jan. 14.

The conference format is changing for this year’s event. Session proposals are still open for the following:

  • Educational Session (75-minute presentation)
  • Interactive Tech Lab (45-minute presentation)
  • Learning Lounge (30-minute presentation)
  • Career and Global Hubs (60-min presentation)
  • Preconference Seminars (Three-hour session)
  • Ignite Session (20 slides at 15 seconds each)

The conference will run Sept. 26-28 in Louisville.

Learn more.

Ashley Dobson is NACAC’s communications manager for content and social media. You can reach her at adobson@nacacnet.org.

Vets Face Barriers When Applying to Many Elite Universities

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Veterans bring life experience and a unique perspective to college classrooms. So why aren’t vets found on the campuses of the most selective schools in the US?

Out of about 1 million veterans and their family members enrolled in higher education under the GI Bill, just 844 veterans are enrolled in the nation’s 36 most selective schools.

“In leadership and life, symbolism counts. Intentional or not, the low numbers of veterans signals to all of higher ed that these students do not matter,” community college writing professor Wick Sloane told The Hechinger Report.

Continue reading Vets Face Barriers When Applying to Many Elite Universities

Parenting Your College Student: Navigating New Terrain Over Winter Break

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The Class of 2022 is home from college for their first winter break and many parents are seeing a new dynamic in their relationship with their children.

These college freshmen have just had their first taste of independence and striking the right balance can be tough for families.

“This is the hard work of being the parent to a college student,” parenting expert and doctor Deborah Gilboa told the Washington Post. “You got them here, now it’s time to let them go and let them thrive.”

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Transition to College Can be Challenging for Rural Students

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The faces of rural education in America are changing, but the challenges these students encounter in earning a college degree have not.

Universities have been slow to recognize these issues, but programs for supporting rural students are starting to crop up across the country.

“We never really came to terms with the fact that they needed extra support,” Naomi Norman, associate vice president for instruction at the University of Georgia, told NPR.

Though rural students graduate from high school at higher rates than urban students and at about the same levels as suburban students, only 59 percent go straight to college. And even if they enroll, they are more likely to drop out than their suburban and urban counterparts.

Continue reading Transition to College Can be Challenging for Rural Students

Survey: Admission Professionals Sound Off About Social Media Checks

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“You know, colleges can see that. You really should watch what you post.”

It’s a common refrain from parents and teachers throughout the college admission process, but are admission officers actually checking social media?

A new survey by Kaplan Test Prep found that just 25 percent of college admission officers check the social media accounts of prospective students, down from a high of 40 percent in 2015.

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